Autism Interaction and Communication Guide

For professionals

Two women are shown sitting at a table having a conversation.These resources for professionals feature guides on Executive Functioning, Emotional Regulation, Theory of Mind, Sensory Differences, and general communication with individuals on the autism spectrum. They were developed by ASERT with collaboration from behavioral health professionals.

Communication Connection

Communication tips and recommendations for engaging someone with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Attention

  • Use the person’s name at beginning, so it’s clear you are addressing them.
  • Help the person feel comfortable by talking about a special interest or topic. Help the person feel comfortable by talking about a special interest or topic.
  • Be aware of your environment. A noisy, crowded room may make communication difficult.

Questions

  • Give a longer response window to a question.
  • Don’t ask too many questions.
  • Keep them short and close-ended.
  • Offer options or choices.
  • Be specific: “What did you orderfor lunch?” instead of “How wasyour lunch?”

Body Language

  • Don’t rely on non-verbal cues such as eye contact,  gestures, and tone of voice.
  • Many people with ASD report eye contact as difficult and uncomfortable.

Verbal Communication

  • Use concise sentences to prevent overload.
  • Pause between ideas.
  • Be literal. Avoid irony, sarcasm, figures of speech, or exaggerations.
  • Explaining something complex? Write it out, make a visual, or number the topics.

Executive Functioning Chart

Executive Functioning (EF) is a group of high-level mental processes that help us regulate, control, and manage thoughts and actions. They are comprised of Organizing Functions and Regulation Functions. These skills tend to be difficult for people with ASD.

Organizing Functions

Planning: Assess your own needs, come up with options, making a sequenced plan.

Examples of difficulty for a person with ASD:

    • Double-booking an appointment.
    • Difficulty accomplishing multi-step tasks, like cooking or laundry.
    • Difficulty prioritizing.

Problem Solving: Can notice and overcome obstacles to a goal.

Examples of difficulty for a person with ASD:

    • Difficulty coming up with a plan “B” for a get-together with friends when the restaurant is closed or the gathering needs to be rescheduled.

Working Memory: Can hold information in mind while completing a task.

Examples of difficulty for a person with ASD:

    • Difficulty dialing a phone number as a person reads it aloud.
    • Difficulty following multi-step directions when given verbally.

Shifting/Flexibility: Can change based on responses to the environment.

Examples of difficulty for a person with ASD:

    • Difficulty switching to a task that needs to be completed immediately.
    • Difficulty getting to work because usual bus route is delayed/re-routed.

Attention: Can focus on a task, even when uninterested.

Examples of difficulty for a person with ASD:

    • Difficulty completing a task because of distractions or interruptions.
    • Difficulty with being on time because of the inability to estimate how long it will take to get ready, given distractions.

Regulating Functions

Inhibition: Blocking an action or thought.

Examples of difficulty for a person with ASD:

    • Talking about a topic, even when asked to stop.

Self-monitoring: Adjusting actions if something goes wrong.

Examples of difficulty for a person with ASD:

    • Difficulty completing a task when in a different environment, such as remembering coping skills that are used effectively at home.
    • Difficulty driving (awareness of speed, the location of the car to others, etc.).

Initiation: Getting started on a task.

Examples of difficulty for a person with ASD:

    • Procrastination of a non-preferred task, possibly caused by not knowing how to break down a project into steps or not knowing how to begin.

Interacting with Individuals on the Autism Spectrum

What is autism?

Autism Spectrum Disorder(ASD) is a complex developmental disorder that can cause difficulty with how a person thinks, feels, communicates, and relates to others. A person with ASD may also engage in repetitive patterns of behavior and motor mannerisms, have restricted ranges of interest and/or inflexibility in adhering to routines or rituals.

Emotional Regulation

    • Emotional Regulation (ER) is the process used to modify emotional reactions.
    • ER is a common issue for those with behavioral health diagnoses.
    • Common behavioral health diagnoses in ASD include Depression, Anxiety, and Obsessive
      Compulsive Disorder.

How do ER Problems Look in ASD?

    • Issues recognizing emotions in one’s self.
    • Goes from “0 to 100”; Unaware of emotional escalation until it’s too late.
    • Unable to let go of an intense feeling.
    • Meltdowns (can argue, make derogatory comments, be verbally aggressive, disrespectful, etc.)

What Can You Do?

    • Does the person know when a meltdown is coming? Ask how you can help.
    • Identify and minimize triggers.
    • Have a meltdown plan in place for that person.
    • Give them space and time.
    • Reduce environment stimuli.
    • Calming strategies (mindfulness, relaxation).
    • Develop a system to help cue them to start using a coping strategy.

What is Executive Functioning?

Executive Functioning (EF) is a group of highlevel processes that help us regulate, control, and manage thoughts and actions. EF is not a symptom of ASD, but many people with ASD have it. Sometimes EF creates a gap between skill and performance.

How do EF Problems Look in ASD?

Difficulty with: being on time, prioritizing tasks, talking about a subject even when asked to stop, shifting to a task that needs to be completed immediately, shifting away from a preferred task, and following multistep directions.

What Can You Do?

    • Breakdown multi-step goals (Chunking).
    • Help find and use functional alternatives. Examples include: Making to-do lists, using a planner or digital app for scheduling, and setting own deadlines.

What is Theory of Mind?

Theory of Mind is the ability to understand other’s beliefs, desires, and intentions. Knowing that others have different thoughts than you and being able to predict them. The ability to show empathy at appropriate times and accurately take the perspective of others into account.

How Does Theory of Mind Look in ASD?

    • People with ASD have delays in developing Theory of Mind and often continue to struggle.
    • Examples include: Only seeing one option to solve a problem, becoming upset when
      someone doesn’t know the answer to a question, unintentionally making a comment that could be interpreted as rude, and an inability to understand sarcasm.

What Can You Do?

    • Ask perspective-taking questions, like “How do you think that person feels in this situation?” or “How would you feel in this situation?”
    • Use examples as teaching moments, like “What you said could be interpreted in this way.”
    • Use movies and TV as examples to identify the emotions and motives of others.

Sensory Differences in ASD

Many individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have challenges in sensory areas that affect their daily lives. They can be hyper and/or hyposensitive to any of the senses.

Hyposensitive Examples (Under-Sensitive)

Person may seek sensory input by:

    • Banging objects loudly
    • Spinning
    • Rocking
    • Showing a preference for spicy food or other strong flavors
    • Smelling or sniffing objects

Hypersensitive Examples (Over-Sensitive)

    • Bothered by loud places, particular noises (e.g., squeaky door), fluorescent lights, scented
      products, and certain fabrics or textures
    • Food sensitivities (strong flavors or certain textures) may lead to limited diets
    • Interference with hygiene (hair brushing and/or teeth brushing may be painful)
    • Sensitivity to touch
    • Fine motor difficulties (handwriting, buttons, shoelaces, etc.)

Signs of Sensory Overload

    • Covering of ears/eyes
    • Putting head down
    • Wearing a hood, sunglasses, headphones, or hat indoors
    • Appears stressed or anxious
    • Appears to be in pain
    • Marked change from usual behavior

How to Help

    • Ask about sensory concerns
    • When meeting individually and in groups, consider the space
    • Try to use windows, lamps, or indirect lighting instead of fluorescent lights
    • Consider a private room instead of a common area with background noise
    • Provide “fidgets” for people to use during downtime (stress balls, fidget spinners, Koosh balls, etc.)

Guía de interacción y comunicación con el autismo

Consejos y recomendaciones para comunicarse e interactuar con personas del espectro autista.

ATENCIÓN

  • Diga el nombre de la persona al principio para que quedeclaro se está dirigiendo a ella.
  • Haga que se sienta cómoda hablándole sobre un tema oalgo que le interese.
  • Sea consciente del entorno. Si el lugar es ruidoso o haymucha gente, la comunicación puede ser difícil.

PREGUNTAS

  • Dele más tiempo paracontestar las preguntas.
  • No le haga demasiadaspreguntas.
  • Haga preguntas breves yque se puedan respondercon un “sí” o un “no”.
  • Ofrézcale opciones oalternativas.
  • Haga preguntas específicas,por ejemplo: “¿Qué pedistepara almorzar?” en lugar de“¿Cómo te fue en elalmuerzo?”.

LENGUAJE CORPORAL

  • No espere que funcionen lasclaves no verbales, como elcontacto visual, los gestos yel tono de la voz.
  • Muchas personas contrastornos del espectroautista dicen que les resultadifícil mantener contactovisual ya que hace que sesientan incómodas.

COMUNICACIÓN VERBAL

  • Utilice oraciones concisas para evitar el exceso de palabras.
  • Haga pausas entre las ideas.
  • Sea literal. Evite usar expresiones irónicas, sarcasmos, metáforas oexageraciones.
  • ¿Tiene que explicar algo que es complejo? Escríbalo, haga unailustración o numere los temas.

Funcionamiento ejecutivo

El funcionamiento ejecutivo es un conjunto de procesos mentales de alto nivel que nos ayudan a regular, controlar y manejar nuestros pensamientos y actos. Estos procesos mentales comprenden las funciones de organización y las funciones de regulación. Estas habilidades suelen ser difíciles para las personas con trastornos del espectro autista.

Funciones de organización

Planificación: Evaluar las necesidades propias, encontrar opciones, trazar un plan secuenciado. 

Ejemplos de dificultades para una persona con trastorno del espectro autista:

    • Hacer dos citas simultáneas.
    • Dificultad para completar tareas de varios pasos, como cocinar o lavar la ropa.
    • Dificultad para establecer prioridades.

Resolución de problemas: Poder identificar y superar los obstáculos para alcanzar un objetivo. 

Ejemplos de dificultades para una persona con trastorno del espectro autista:

    • Dificultad para idear un plan “B” para reunirse con amigos si el restaurante está cerrado o cuando es necesario reprogramar la reunión de acuerdo con las necesidades de cada uno.

Memoria de trabajo: Poder mantener información en la mente mientras se está completando una tarea. 

Ejemplos de dificultades para una persona con trastorno del espectro autista:

    • Dificultad para marcar un número de teléfono mientras alguien lo dice en voz alta.
    • Dificultad para seguir instrucciones de varios pasos cuando se dan de forma oral.

Capacidad para cambiar y flexibilidad: Poder cambiar en función de respuestas al entorno. 

Ejemplos de dificultades para una persona con trastorno del espectro autista:

    • Dificultad para cambiar a otra tarea que se tiene que hacer inmediatamente.
    • Dificultad para llegar al trabajo porque el autobús que suele tomar está retrasado o cambia de ruta.

Atención: Poder concentrarse en una tarea, aunque no se esté interesado en ella.

Ejemplos de dificultades para una persona con trastorno del espectro autista:

    • Dificultad para completar una tarea si sufre distracciones o interrupciones.
    • Dificultad para ser puntual debido a su incapacidad para calcular cuánto tiempo le tomará prepararse para salir, debido a las distracciones.

Regulation Functions Funciones de regulación

Inhibition: Blocking an action or thought. Inhibición: Bloquear una acción o pensamiento.

Ejemplos de dificultades para una persona con trastorno del espectro autista:

    • Hablar sobre un tema, aun cuando le pidan que deje de hacerlo.

Autocontrol: Ajustar las acciones si algo va mal. 

Ejemplos de dificultades para una persona con trastorno del espectro autista:

    • Dificultad para completar una tarea en un entorno diferente, como recordar las habilidades para sobrellevar situaciones que usan eficazmente en su hogar.
    • Dificultad para conducir un auto (consciencia de la velocidad, el lugar donde está el auto en relación con los demás, etc.).

Cómo interactuar con personas en el espectro autista

¿Qué es el autismo?

Los trastornos del espectro autista (ASD, por sus siglas en inglés) son trastornos complejos del desarrollo que pueden causar problemas en la manera en que una persona piensa, siente, se comunica y se relaciona con los demás.

Regulación emocional

    • La regulación emocional es el proceso que usamos para modificar las reacciones emocionales.
    • Es un problema frecuente en las
      personas con diagnósticos de salud conductual.
    • En las personas con ASD son frecuentes los diagnósticos de salud conductual de depresión, ansiedad y trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo.

¿Cómo se manifiestan los problemas de regulación emocional en las personas con ASD?

    • Problemas para identificar emociones en uno mismo.
    • Ir “de 0 a 100” en corto tiempo, no tener consciencia de la escalada emocional hasta que es demasiado tarde.
    • Incapacidad para desprenderse de un sentimiento intenso.
    • Crisis emocionales (discutir, hacer comentarios despectivos, ser verbalmente agresivo, faltar al respeto, etc.)

¿Qué puede hacer usted?

    • ¿La persona sabe cuándo se avecina una crisis emocional? Pregúntele cómo puede ayudarla.
    • Identifique y reduzca los factores desencadenantes.
    • Elabore un plan para que esa persona pueda afrontar sus crisis emocionales.
    • Asegúrese de darle espacio y tiempo.
    • Reduzca los estímulos ambientales.
    • Aplique estrategias para calmarla (mindfulness, relajación).
    • Develop a system to help cue them to start
      using a coping strategy. Diseñe un sistema para ayudarla a saber cuándo debe comenzar a usar una estrategia de afrontamiento.

¿Qué es el funcionamiento ejecutivo?

El funcionamiento ejecutivo es un conjunto de procesos de alto nivel que nos ayudan a regular, controlar y manejar nuestros pensamientos y actos.

¿Cómo se manifiestan los problemas de funcionamiento ejecutivo en las personas con ASD?

Dificultades para ser puntuales, priorizar tareas, dejar de hablar de un tema aun cuando se les pida que no lo sigan haciendo, cambiar de una tarea a otra que se debe completar inmediatamente, dejar de hacer algo que les gusta para cambiar de tarea y seguir instrucciones de varios pasos.

¿Qué puede hacer usted?

    • Dividir los objetivos en varios pasos.
    • Ayudarle a identificar y usar alternativas funcionales.
      Por ejemplo: Hacer listas de tareas pendientes, usar un planificador o una app digital para programarse, y fijar sus propios plazos.

¿Qué es la teoría de la mente?

El concepto “teoría de la mente” se refiere a la habilidad para comprender las creencias, los deseos y las intenciones de los demás. Saber que otras personas no piensan lo mismo que uno y ser capaz de predecirlas. La capacidad para mostrar empatía en los momentos adecuados y tomar en cuenta correctamente los puntos de vista de los demás.

¿Cómo se manifiesta la teoría de la mente en las personas con ASD?

    • Las personas con ASD experimentan retrasos en el desarrollo de la teoría de la mente y a menudo siguen teniendo problemas en esta área.
    • Por ejemplo: Ver solo una opción para resolver un problema, molestarse cuando alguien no conoce la respuesta a una pregunta, hacer sin querer un comentario que podría interpretarse como impertinente e incapacidad para entender el sarcasmo.

¿Qué puede hacer usted?

    • Haga preguntas que inviten a adoptar una perspectiva distinta, como “¿Cómo crees que se siente esa persona en esta situación?” o “¿Cómo te sentirías tú en esta situación?”.
    •  Utilice ejemplos como momentos de enseñanza, como “Lo que dijiste podría interpretarse de esta manera”.
    • Utilice las películas y los programas de TV como ejemplos para identificar las emociones y los motivos de los demás.

Diferencias sensoriales en las personas con trastornos del espectro autista

Muchas personas con trastornos del espectro autista enfrentan desafíos sensoriales que afectan su vida diaria. Pueden ser hiper o hiposensibles en cualquiera de los sentidos.

Ejemplos de hiposensibilidad (sensibilidad disminuida)

La persona puede buscar estímulos sensoriales adoptando cualquiera de estos comportamientos:

    • Golpear objetos ruidosamente
    • Girar
    • Mecerse
    • Mostrar preferencia por comidas muy condimentadas u otros sabores fuertes
    • Oler u olfatear objetos

Ejemplos de hipersensibilidad (sensibilidad extrema)

    • Sentirse molesta en lugares ruidosos o a causa de determinados sonidos (p. ej., el chirrido de una puerta), luces fluorescentes, productos perfumados y ciertas telas o texturas.
    • La sensibilidad a alimentos (sabores fuertes o ciertas texturas) puede hacer que tenga una dieta limitada.
    • Interferencias en la higiene (cepillarse el pelo o los dientes puede resultarle doloroso).
    • Sensibilidad al tacto.
    • Dificultades de motricidad fina (escribir a mano, abrochar botones, atar los cordones de los zapatos, etc.)

Señales de sobrecarga sensorial

    • Cubrirse los oídos o los ojos.
    • Apoyar la cabeza en la mesa.
    • Usar una capucha, anteojos de sol, audífonos o gorra en ambientes interiores.
    • Aspecto de tener estrés o ansiedad.
    • Aspecto de sentir dolor.
    • Notable cambio con respecto a su comportamiento habitual

Cómo ayudar

    • Pregúntele por sus necesidades sensoriales.
    • Cuando organice una reunión individual o en grupo, tenga en cuenta el espacio.
    • Trate de aprovechar la luz de las ventanas, lámparas o luces indirectas en lugar de luces fluorescentes.
    • Considere hacer la reunión en un lugar privado en vez de un área común con ruido de fondo.
    • Proporcione juguetes antiestrés para que las personas puedan usarlos durante los descansos (pelotas antiestrés, spinners, pelotas Koosh, etc.).

Rate this resource

Average rating:

Thank you for rating this resource!

Other downloads

Name Description Type File
Autism Interaction and Communication Guide Communication Connection pdf Download file: Autism Interaction and Communication Guide
Autism Interaction and Communication Guide Executive Functioning Chart pdf Download file: Autism Interaction and Communication Guide
Autism Interaction and Communication Guide Interacting with Individuals on the Autism Spectrum pdf Download file: Autism Interaction and Communication Guide
Autism Interaction and Communication Guide Sensory Differences in ASD pdf Download file: Autism Interaction and Communication Guide
Spanish Communication Connection GUÍA DEINTERACCIÓN YCOMUNICACIÓNCON EL AUTISMO pdf Download file: Spanish Communication Connection
Spanish EF Chart Funcionamiento ejecutivo pdf Download file: Spanish EF Chart
Spanish Interacting with Individuals on the Spectrum Cómo interactuar con personas enel espectro autista pdf Download file: Spanish Interacting with Individuals on the Spectrum
Cómo interactuar con personas enel espectro autista Diferencias sensoriales en las personas con trastornos delespectro autista pdf Download file: Cómo interactuar con personas enel espectro autista

This information was developed by the Autism Services, Education, Resources, and Training Collaborative (ASERT). For more information, please contact ASERT at 877-231-4244 or info@PAautism.org. ASERT is funded by the Bureau of Supports for Autism and Special Populations, PA Department of Human Services.