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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Health and Safety Guide

ASERT has compiled resources for those with autism and those who care for people with autism relating to the current COVID-19 outbreak.

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My Roommate, My Cat

By Out-of-Sync Woman
There’s a bumper sticker I really like that says “Who rescued who?” I think the bumper sticker has a really good point, especially these days. I don’t know how well I would do without my rescue, an orange tabby. I adopted him a few years ago after a bad breakup and I’ve always been happy that I did that. Both the breakup and adopting my cat! Over the years, during the high points and low points, my cat has been there grounding me, reminding me to be in the moment or at least to pay attention to him.
I call him my furry roommate; he doesn’t pay the rent, unfortunately, but he’s there to talk, to pet, play with, or just sit in my lap. It’s nice to be able to sit down at the end of a long day and just pet him. He helps me by insisting I interact with him. I’m working on paying more attention to him by being in the moment and to daydream less. I’ve been thinking about getting him certified as an emotional support animal since he is so important to my daily success.
Don’t get me wrong, there are times when I do find my cat frustrating like when he wakes me up several times in the middle of the night. Sometimes he chews my paperwork or gets into my clean laundry as well. There are other downsides as he needs a cat sitter when I’m away on a trip. He needs to go to the vet. I also need to budget money for his care and comfort. Pets can be expensive, they take time and energy. When I adopted my cat, I promised to take care of him for his lifetime and I try my best to fulfill my promise every day.
All in all, I’m grateful that I have the opportunity to share my life with this remarkable cat. I’m so happy he lives with me. His presence reminds me that my problems are small and my joys are bigger. I urge everyone to think about and embrace what brings them happiness and joy, to focus less on what brings sorrow.